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New Vacancy - Digital Marketing Assistant
15 June 2017
New Vacancy - Digital Marketing Assistant

Salary £18-20k

We have a great opportunity for a recently graduated marketer, possibly looking for their second job role, to join us as a Digital Marketing Assistant.


We are a highly respected engineering consultancy working across many industries and a huge variety of projects. We are a young, energetic team of highly motivated engineers and whilst we might be extremely busy, we still make time to enjoy what we do.

The successful candidate will have gained a degree in digital marketing communications, with experience of high quality copywriting - being clear, concise and engaging are key.

We provide engineering services via our website and you will be responsible for keeping it up to date with new content such as case studies and our latest services. You will also create blog & social media posts and newsletters to keep our clients informed of what we are doing.

You may already have gained some experience within an online-based business, including PPC, SEO and web optimisation, which are essential to driving enquiries. You will have the support of an external PPC/SEO agency to do this, who you will work closely with, providing relevant product information and data.

You will be responsible for analysing overall leads (volume, type and source) and web performance (traffic, content etc.): you will provide recommendations on how to use this information to improve what we are doing. 
In addition, you will help organise sales visits and events, arranging printed materials as required and submitting our messages for relevant printed and digital media.

As part of a small team of 10, you will need to 'muck in', such as answering calls and helping with client CRM. We are a hard-working and determined team and as well as this, we would also expect you to be passionate about growing your marketing knowledge and skills. 

Your salary will be reviewed in your first year.

The role will be located initially just outside Fleet but we will be moving nearer to Guildford in the coming months.

Required skills & expertise:

o Web management (html useful but not essential)

o SEO & PPC
o Copywriting
o Excellent communication skills

o Salary range £18-20k dependent on experience

 

Job Location:
• Nr Fleet then relocating to Guildford area

Required education:
• Marketing degree 2:1 minimum

Required language:
• English

 

Please send your CV to enquiry@dcwhite.co.uk


Latest design case study for Dustech
09 June 2017
Latest design case study for Dustech Design Substantiation for Dustech, a global leader in environmentally friendly dust control and a long-standing client of DC White CE, approached us for a substantiation of their C1558B Wheat Starch Bag Filter. 

 

The work was done at design stage, to ensure any issues would be addressed before expensive tooling or manufacturing had occurred. Using their drawings and 3D model as reference, we produced a 3D model using ‘shell elements’. We then exported it into MIDAS finite element analysis software, where we applied thicknesses to the model, set boundary conditions and applied the required internal pressure. Self-weight, buckling and hoisting analyses were then performed. 

 

The design passed the substantiation requirements, documented in our report with detailed findings of the analyses. This job is a good example of the essential bread and butter work we do, giving clients’ confidence that their designs are up to the task and critically ensuring that changes, where required, are captured at the earliest stage in a product’s development. Specifically, we regularly substantiate a range of bag filter designs destined for a wide range of industries. 


 

Figure shown: Von Mises stress plot (with exaggerated deflections) of the bag filter with the self-weight and internal pressure applied.

Read our latest newsletter - Tiny Vibrations
11 May 2017
Read our latest newsletter - Tiny Vibrations

Latest news from DC White Consulting Engineers


A very warm welcome to our Spring newsletter. We are freshly returned from two exhibitions, where we were excited to show the new Recovib Tiny wireless vibration recorders to the engineering community. 

 

 

See below our stand at the Southern Manufacturing & Electronics Show at the end of March. We had a great deal of interest in the Tiny, with many people attracted by the model car: this was to simulate the capabilities of the miniature vibration recorder on a full size vehicle.

 

 

Recovib Tiny at Southern Manufacturing 

 

 

There's more information on the Recovib Tiny below, including a new video case study, plus a look at the other industrial accelerometers in the range.

In addition, this month we also take a look at a recent case study showing what we can do in design optimisation. in this instance for a cafeteria stool!

As ever, your comments are welcomed on anything you read here, or if we can help with any of your engineering queries.

 

 

Happy reading,

 

 

The DC White team

New case study: The Tria-axial  Recovib Tiny

 

 

The revolutionary miniature wireless vibration recorder

Here is the latest video case study from Micromega: New Tiny Video Case Study. In this video we demonstrate NVH validation (Noise Vibration and Harshness) for an automotive parts manufacturer. Using two Recovib Tiny's attached to the underside of the vehicle, the video demonstrates the ease and speed of analysis enabled with the Tiny's unique features.



 

 Read more about the new Recovib Tiny, available exclusively in the UK from DC White Consulting Engineers.

 

New Design Optimisation case study


Cafeteria Seating gets a Ruggedized Re-design
 
When a market leader in educational seating approached us to assess proposed design developments and optimise the design of one of their ABS plastic products, we needed to apply some lateral thinking. The ABS plastic seats were cracking around the mounting post and concern was raised as to whether different methodologies for attaching the seats to the metal posts was causing the cracking, or increasing the likelihood of a crack occurring.



There is a saying that you should "never under-estimate the ingenuity of stupidity", but when designing for the education market we needed to think more along the lines of "never under-estimate the ingenuity of abuse a youngster can apply to your design". Our starting point was to look at the range of sizes and weights of users, as teachers may use the seats as well as students. We then considered what a 'reasonable level of abuse' was to apply to the seat surface and decided that a person standing on the edge of the seat was a foreseeable event.
 
Using finite element analysis software we prepared computer models of three seat designs supplied by the client and evaluated the resulting stress plots to determine percentage improvement in the different design stages. Their second developmental design was 14% stronger than their initial design. 

However we then optimised that design which allowed us to minimise the amount of additional material required and also reduced the modifications needed to the seat moulds. It was 36% stronger than the client's second design and 55% stronger than the initial design, which in real terms means it would need a person weighing 232Kg sitting on our design to break it. 

Different methods of seat attachment are used in the USA and Europe, but we were able to show that these did not cause the cracking. We were able to prove that in the USA, they were applying almost 100 times the necessary cracking force into the seat attachment bolt.
 
The client was very happy with the suggestions contained within our report and has requested design optimisation of more of their products.   
 

Read more about our design optimisation service


New wired accelerometers

DC White CE exclusive UK distributors

We are delighted to bring the Micromega range of industrial accelerometers to the UK market. 

Recovib Tiny at Southern Manufacturing 

The key benefits of the new IAC range are:

- Bridge the gap between the performance of laboratory accelerometers (which are often expensive, fragile and offer low protection) and the robustness of industrial accelerometers (which are sometimes cheaper but often noisy and inaccurate).

- Can be deployed in industrial environments for monitoring machinery or structures.

- Widely used in a variety of fields, such as the machine tools, precision machining and on-shore and off-shore wind energy sectors in monitoring or active vibration control applications.

Read more

 

 

New case study - Kennet Pumping Station - Freedom Connections
11 May 2017
New case study - Kennet Pumping Station - Freedom Connections

D C White work with Freedom Solutions to address potential downtime at Kennet Pumping Station

 

The Challenge

 

D C White was recently approached by Freedom Connections (engineering design company) at the request of the Environmental Agency to perform a thermal analysis of a low voltage electrical cabinet at the Kennet Pumping Station in Cambridgeshire.

 

The cabinet controls the starting system for a crucial underground water pump, 60 metres below surface, feeding the local water supply.

 

The Solution

 Using a bespoke hardware setup designed especially for the project, we were able to measure the temperature of 7 individual components inside the cabinet, simultaneously for a period of 5 hours.  The 7 components included the water pump soft start.

 

The process was performed without interfering with the normal operation. The cabinet door was locked to reduce the risk of harm to personnel.

 

The Outcome

 

From the data obtained from the thermocouple arrangement we were able to produce evidence that one of the internal components was operating above the maximum allowable ambient temperature of 50° C.

 

Recommendations were provided on how to lower the ambient temperature including reporting on which components were hottest.

Suggestions included the use of fans and the uprating of a heavily loaded component.

 

The Benefits

 

This was the first time D C White had worked with Freedom Connections, who chose to work with us due to competitive pricing and the promise of a quick turnaround of the project.

 

The cost of reducing the temperature inside the cabinet is far outweighed by the downtime encountered as a result of component failure, which ultimately could have included penalty charges for interrupted water supply.

 

This type of preventative analysis work is very often overlooked; the relatively low costs are typically a fraction of that involved with replacing a failed component.

 

Customer Feedback

 

‘We have enjoyed working with Tom Jowett from DC White who has provided exactly what we required, on time and to a highest level of professionalism.

 

DC White was also able to offer flexibility; Tom made himself available to work at short notice according to site availability.

 

We hope to work with DC White again in the future.’

 

David O’Brien, Project Manager, Freedom Connections.

 

Read our newsletter - From Harvests to Radiation Detection
11 May 2017
Read our newsletter - From Harvests to Radiation Detection
Welcome to our late summer newsletter.

As the weather breaks, we hope you enjoyed the warm weather and the warm glow from GB's success in Rio. We've been busy here at Team DCW with plenty of new work coming through - see four new case studies published in this newsletter: as Albert Einstein is quoted to have said "Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving forward".

I'm sure our hugely successful cycling team would agree, but even they need a break at some point to 'smell the roses' and re-charge the batteries. So, we hope you have had time to relax, take a breather and have fun.

And if this newsletter finds you by a pool somewhere or on a gorgeous sandy beach, do send us a postcard - we'd love to hear from you!

Holiday Reading

So, new case studies this month (links are on the right) and a new Digest from Doug: our lead case study covers a very interesting project for Symetrica, involving the design of a roof-mounted radiation detector, followed by Doug's new-found love affair with combine harvesters: it may not be a summer sizzler but we're sure it would beat any in-flight magazine article!

Happy reading,

The DC White team

 


New case study:Radiation Detector Mount
Vibration Analysis for Symetrica

Symetrica is a global leader in radiation detection and identification equipment. Their range of products, from handheld devices to mobile solutions, is used in border protection, law enforcement, military and emergency applications.

 

DC White Consulting Engineers were able to assist Symetrica in the development of a shock-resistant enclosure for their detection equipment, to be mounted on vehicle roofs.



Figure 1 – Vehicle-roof-mounted radiation detector.

The crystal detectors are typically brittle in nature with characteristic bending strengths as low as 1.6MPa, so the primary design concern was to protect them from the harsh shock and vibration loads seen by vehicle roof mounted devices. The solution was to encapsulate the crystals in layers of specially selected isolating foam to protect them from external vibrations and shock loads.



Doug's Digest


All those years ago when I started this consultancy, there was an attitude in the various areas of engineering that you could only consult if you had years of experience in that field. Today the situation is very different: “If you are an engineer, you can help us.”


Harvest Home

Well, I have learnt that to be not quite true. For food production, petrochemical, and manufacturing – it is true, but agricultural engineering is a different matter. Our offices overlook an eighteen acre field. It has seen crops ranging from cherries (a complete failure), wheat, oats, potatoes (another disaster) and sheep (very noisy). Over the past few years cereals have been grown with good yields. Each year the combine comes for the harvest. Each year it breaks down.

BIG Tonkas

This year we find ourselves working for a manufacturer of agricultural machinery: big expensive toys (and no, not the same combine company). Never before have we worked in this field, pardon the pun, but we are learning rapidly, because experience really does matter. Most industries see continuous operation with variations driven by maintenance outages and seasonal variations. To me farming is a scary business, driven by the seasons and by the weather. It’s dry, it’s August, the crop must be harvested. It’s going to rain – get it in now; an hour of rain will delay the harvest by five days. Combine’s busted? – fix it! The result is that the manufacturer’s maintenance team are faced with two problems: what originally went wrong and what has the farmer done to get it going again?


Hi-Tech

In the days of mechanical and electrical limit stops it must have been a nightmare to undo the farmer’s ‘adjustments’. Today everything is computer controlled, GPS positioning and nice displays of what is right and what has gone wrong, so keeping it going should be straightforward – but is it?

Fault diagnostics are far better than you get on the dashboard of a modern car but can often lead to the hard-pressed farmer using his 12” adjustable spanner to ‘tune’ the offending part. Even worse the computer might have been electronically “re-tuned” – just look on Ebay and you will find devices that will reprogram tractors, bailers and combines to make them run faster, to override the wheel spin control, or make the engine give more power. Did you know that tractor engines are deliberately de-rated to improve their reliability and that they can create their maximum tow-bar pull at about 80% power rating? Increase power and you actually lose pull and you spin the wheels.


Grain of truth


To those in the business, all this is obvious, but I will own up to being totally ignorant on such matters.Combines in different parts of Europe have different settings for cutting; there are differences within the UK as you move northwards; differences for flat and hilly fields.And what I find really interesting is that the heart of the combine has not really changed in the last 100 years.The details of grain processing methods have greatly improved the rate of harvesting, but the mechanisms are essentially the same.The harvester is a truly brilliant bit of engineering - even if our visiting machine breaks down every year.

 

Oh, yes, engineering is fun - and you never stop learning.

Doug
September 2016

New Design Optimisation Case Study
27 April 2017
New Design Optimisation Case Study Cafeteria Seating gets a Ruggedized Re-design

When a market leader in educational seating approached us to assess proposed design developments and optimise the design of one of their ABS plastic products, we needed to apply some lateral thinking. The ABS plastic seats were cracking around the mounting post and concern was raised as to whether different methodologies for attaching the seats to the metal posts was causing the cracking, or increasing the likelihood of cracking occurring.
  
There is a saying that you should "never under-estimate the ingenuity of stupidity", but when designing for the education market we needed to think more along the lines of "never under-estimate the ingenuity of abuse a youngster can apply to your design". Our starting point was to look at the range of sizes and weights of users, as teachers may use the seats as well as students. We then considered what a 'reasonable level of abuse' was to apply to the seat surface and decided that a person standing on the edge of the seat was a foreseeable event.

Using finite element analysis software we prepared computer models of three seat designs and evaluated the resulting stress plots to determine percentage improvement in the different design stages. The second developmental design from the client was 14% stronger than their initial design. Our 'optimised design' was able to minimise the amount of additional material required and also reduced the modifications needed to the seat moulds. 
The 'optimised design' was 36% stronger than the client's second design and 55% stronger than the initial design, which in real terms means it would need a person weighing 232Kg sitting on our design to break it. Though the different methods for seat attachment in the USA and Europe did not cause the cracking, we were able to prove that in the USA, they were applying almost 100 times the necessary force into the seat attachment bolt.

The client was very happy with the suggestions of our 'optimised design' and has requested 'design optimisation of more of their products.

New video - a evolution in Wireless Vibration Monitoring
30 March 2017
New video - a evolution in Wireless Vibration Monitoring

The revolutionary new Recovib Tiny miniature vibration recorder


DC White Consulting Engineers is delighted to bring the Tri-axial Recovib Tiny vibration recorder to the UK market, as sole distributors.


Watch the latest video case study:



 

The products offer several benefits over more classical accelerometers for use in all types of heavy machinery and industrial environments.


From food processing and chemical plants, to shake tables and wind turbines, these tiny wireless monitors are ideal to fix on to the smallest components for ‘on the spot’ checking of vibration levels.

Read More

iMechE Presentation September 2016
16 January 2017
iMechE Presentation September 2016

Dr Doug White recently presented at iMechE 'Vibrations in Rotating Machinery' Conference


(Manchester, 13th- 15th September 2016)

 

The Dynamics of Long Shaft Vertical Pumps


The long drive shafts of vertical axis submerged pumps are usually guided by water-lubricated self-acting journal bearings.  In theory, it can be shown that these bearing offer no linearised radial stiffness and should whirl in normal operation.  Added to this is the industry standard operational criterion that no resonances must occur within a 20% band either side of the running frequency – but how do you support a non-whirling shaft with zero-stiffness bearings?  In practice, resonances often occur close to, or even at, the running speed and the pumps usually perform without problem.  The generally accepted theory for the dynamics of vertical self-acting bearings is therefore imperfect.  If the behaviour is not fully understood, there is always the potential for unexpected whirl problems.

 

This paper presented an approach to the dynamics of long vertical shafts which includes the hydrodynamic action of the bearings, bearing contact and whirl.  Forward whirl is well understood but whirl induced by bearing contact is more difficult to handle in the general case, but it is an essential requirement.  The authors have developed a software system which has been used to assess and substantiate dozens of different pump arrangements, all of which have successfully commissioned and operated, some inevitably with resonances exactly at the running speed.

 

This paper presented a detailed description of the theory underlying this software with particular emphasis on the handling of highly non-linear bearing behaviour .

 

Click here for full paper



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